Hanging Gymnastics

Achieving Toes-to-Bar

TOES-TO-Bar

Toes-to-Bar is a core-strengthening exercise where the athlete hangs from the bar and raises the toes up until they touch the bar. This movement is the last in a series of movement progressions once the athlete has proper upper body and core stability and strength to effectively complete the movement. A standard progression for athletes would start with hanging knee raises, knees-to-chest, and then toes-to-bar. All of these movements will work the shoulders and core muscles as the athlete tries to maintain a steady position while raising and lowering the legs.

Watch the video clip below for a full explanation of technique, tips and tricks for performing the movement with efficiency, as well as precautions for staying safe.

[embed]https://youtu.be/mOJcOU-l_ps[/embed]

MOVEMENT BASICS:

  1. Hands Just Outside Shoulders: As you jump up on the bar, it may seem logical to place hands directly above your head; however, this position can prevent you from correctly keeping your shoulders engaged throughout the movement. Instead, place your hands slightly outside your shoulder line. This will better engage your back, which is one the strongest muscle groups in your body, and help you keep your shoulders active.
  2. Keep Shoulders Engaged: As you hang from the bar, keep your shoulders actively engaged by focusing on pulling downward with your lat muscles, located in your back. Another way to visualize keeping an active shoulder is to try to close your arm pits. You will notice your shoulders drop correctly and your head and neck rise up appropriately.
  3. Complete Basic Knee Raise: To complete basic knee raises, the second progression in the series of movements toward completing toes to bar, keep your core tight as you hang from the bar and simply raise knees to just above hip height. Lower your legs back down nice and straight and try to prevent a swinging motion or kip as you do so.
  4. Perform Knees-to-Chest: The next progression is to achieve knees-to-chest. This requires a kipping motion that starts from the shoulders, not the legs, and enables more momentum for the athlete to appropriately raise knees above hip height until they reach chest height. Often athletes will try to create a kipping movement with their legs, but this will throw the athlete into an inefficient swing. Instead, just as with other gymnastic movements where you are hanging from the bar, focus on engaging the shoulders to activate the kip.
  5. Achieve Toes-to-Bar: The final progression is to perform toes-to-bar where you will complete the same movement as you did with knees-to-chest, but as your knees reach chest height, simply extend your legs up to touch your toes to the bar. Your kip should be the same as it is with knees-to-chest, but to efficiently touch the toes to the bar, try and focus on flicking your legs up quickly. This last flick of the legs should enable you to reach the bar with your feet while maintaining the proper shoulder engagement and kip motion.

QUESTIONS: Ready to get started, or curious to learn more about how Fierce Play can help you meet your health and wellness goals? Contact us for more information. Also feel free to check out more of our videos series to learn how to perform the basics with solid form and efficiency.

HANGING GYMNASITCS SERIES: Technique at Every Stage

Fierce Play’s Hanging Gymnastics Series focuses on proper technique, as well as tips & tricks, to master some of the foundational movements that will be integrated into many of the workouts you will perform. Start your next workout with the confidence and skills to do the movement safely and effectively.

Reaching the Ring Muscle Up

THE RING MUSCLE UP

The ring muscle up is a gymnastics movement that requires great control and strength in the athlete’s upper body. The movement is completed as the athlete hangs from the rings and pulls his/her torso up above the rings until full lock-out of the arms is achieved. Just as with the bar muscle up, the ring muscle up is a complex movement that often requires athletes to work on various progressions in order to achieve correct technique. This exercise is great for strengthening the entire upper body, as it effectively works not only the shoulders, but also arms, back and core muscles.

Watch the video clip below for a full explanation of technique, tips and tricks for performing the movement with efficiency, as well as precautions for staying safe.

[embed]https://youtu.be/4nv48dKE3dA[/embed]

MOVEMENT BASICS:

  1. Set Up Rings to Correct Height: Set up the rings high enough above your head so that when you are hanging from the rings with arms fully extended, your feet do not touch the ground. You should still be able to jump up and grab the rings easily, but this height will allow for full clearance as you swing your body.
  2. Work the Kip: Just as with the bar muscle up, the kip you will use is a little unique from a traditional pull-up, as you will need to be a bit more patient and allow your body to get further behind the rings so that you can fully swing yourself up and over the rings. With your body further behind the rings, you will generate more momentum that will help get you up and over.
  3. Pull Hands Toward Belly Button: Often athletes will try to pull their hands toward their chest or arm pits as they attempt to get their torso up above the rings. However, this position does not create enough space for you to effectively shift your weight and get your torso over the rings. Instead, as you come out of your kip, focus on pulling your arms and hands down toward your belly button. This motion will create more momentum and help you get your torso much higher ultimately helping you achieve a ring muscle up.
  4. Link Multiples by Pushing Back and Away: To link multiple ring muscle ups together, as you reach the top of the movement and begin to come down, think about pushing yourself back and away to create as much momentum as possible. Remember – the more momentum created with your body, the more efficiency in leveraging your body back up and over the rings once again. (Doing this can put a lot of stress on the shoulder joint. If you struggle with shoulder mobility or pain, you can link muscle ups together by lowering yourself to the bottom of your dip and then falling into your next swing.)
  5. Do a Sit-Up: As your torso reaches the rings, attempt a sit-up to push your torso further forward over the rings. This will help your center of gravity get above the rings correctly so that you can fully push up with your arms and achieve lock out in the arms.
  6. Keep Feet Together: Just as with other gymnastics movements, keep the feet tight together versus flailing apart. This creates greater efficiency in the movement and will improve your ability to link multiple ring muscle ups together.

 

QUESTIONS: Ready to get started, or curious to learn more about how Fierce Play can help you meet your health and wellness goals? Contact us for more information. Also feel free to check out more of our videos series to learn how to perform the basics with solid form and efficiency.

HANGING GYMNASITCS SERIES: Technique at Every Stage

Fierce Play’s Hanging Gymnastics Series focuses on proper technique, as well as tips & tricks, to master some of the foundational movements that will be integrated into many of the workouts you will perform. Start your next workout with the confidence and skills to do the movement safely and effectively.

Bar Muscle Up Basics

THE BAR MUSCLE UP

The bar muscle up is an upper-body-strengthening gymnastics exercise where the athlete hangs from a bar, and then pulls his/her torso up above the bar with arms locked out.  The bar muscle up is complex in nature and normally requires that the athlete achieve various progressions, such as the chest-to-bar pull-up, in order to ultimately achieve correct form and complete the movement. Athletes should feel the shoulders, back and core muscles activated as they complete the bar muscle up.

Watch the video clip below for a full explanation of technique, tips and tricks for performing the movement with efficiency, as well as precautions for staying safe.

[embed]https://youtu.be/rVFxR9TVPrk[/embed]

MOVEMENT BASICS:

  1. All About the Kip: For the bar muscle up, the kip you will use is a little unique from a traditional pull-up, as you will need to be a bit more patient and allow your body to get further behind the bar so that you can fully swing yourself up and over the bar. With your body further behind the bar, you will generate more momentum that will help get you up and over the bar.
  2. Throw Feet Down: As you move through the kip and your feet come up, focus on throwing your feet back down. This opens your hips for a second time allowing you to almost feel as though you are throwing your hips up toward the bar.
  3. Pull Up: As you would with a standard pull-up, focus on pulling up with your arms right as you throw your feet down. The simultaneous pulling and momentum of your feet being thrown downward will shoot your hips up toward the bar and help you get over it.
  4. Do a Sit-Up: As your hips reach the bar itself, attempt a sit-up to push your torso further forward over the bar. This will help your center of gravity get above the bar correctly so that you can fully push up with your arms and achieve lock out in the arms.
  5. Press and Lock it Out: Once you’ve above the bar, press and lock out your arms to complete the rep.

QUESTIONS: Ready to get started, or curious to learn more about how Fierce Play can help you meet your health and wellness goals? Contact us for more information. Also feel free to check out more of our videos series to learn how to perform the basics with solid form and efficiency.

HANGING GYMNASITCS SERIES: Technique at Every Stage

Fierce Play’s Hanging Gymnastics Series focuses on proper technique, as well as tips & tricks, to master some of the foundational movements that will be integrated into many of the workouts you will perform. Start your next workout with the confidence and skills to do the movement safely and effectively.

Ramp Up with the Ring Row

THE RING ROW

A Part of Fierce Play's Hanging Gymnastics Series

The ring row is a hanging gymnastics movement that builds strength in the upper body, in particular the back, muscles, and can act as a great progression movement toward helping athletes achieve a pull up. The ring row is performed when the athlete, holding onto rings that are positioned at hip height, drops his / her body back until arms are extended, and then proceeds to pull the chest up to the rings and back again. The ring row effectively works not only the back muscles, but also arms, and core muscles as the athlete maintains a steady and straight torso while raising and lowering the body from the rings.

Watch the video clip below for a full explanation of technique, tips and tricks for performing the movement with efficiency, as well as precautions for staying safe.

[embed]https://youtu.be/5cDdIgPGL4U[/embed]

MOVEMENT BASICS:

  1. Set Up at Hip Height: Set up the rings to be at hip height as you stand in front of them. This will allow for maximum range of motion while you perform the movement.
  2. Keep Body in Straight Line: As you drop your body back, holding onto the rings, keep your torso and legs in a straight line, and try not to let your body bend at the hip. Instead, keep your core tight and focus on creating a rigid body as you raise your chest up to the rings and back down with arms locked out.
  3. Step Back: If you struggle to perform the ring row in its entirety with chest touching the rings, take a step back from where the rings hang. This creates less range of motion and creates a slight incline, making it easier to complete a proper ring row.
  4. Step Forward: To make the movement more challenging and gain more strength, step forward from where the rings hang before performing the movement. This creates less of an incline in the body, forcing you to move more body weight.

QUESTIONS: Ready to get started, or curious to learn more about how Fierce Play can help you meet your health and wellness goals? Contact us for more information. Also feel free to check out more of our videos series to learn how to perform the basics with solid form and efficiency.

HANGING GYMNASITCS SERIES: Technique at Every Stage

Fierce Play’s Hanging Gymnastics Series focuses on proper technique, as well as tips & tricks, to master some of the foundational movements that will be integrated into many of the workouts you will perform. Start your next workout with the confidence and skills to do the movement safely and effectively.

Ripped Triceps with the Ring Dip

THE RING DIP

A Part of Fierce Play's Hanging Gymnastics Series

The ring dip is a great upper-body strengthening exercise that works multiple muscle groups and requires great core strength. To perform the ring dip, the athlete starts by keeping the torso upright with arms locked out as he/she holds onto a set of rings. The torso should be above the rings as he/she lowers and raises the body by bending at the elbows and allowing the body to drop down until his/her biceps touch the rings. Once at the bottom of the movement, the athlete pushes up until arms are once again locked out and the torso is fully upright above the rings. Considered a compound movement, the ring dip effectively works the shoulders, triceps, chest, and core muscles as the athlete lowers and raises himself / herself. The movement requires great core stability and athletes should feel the shoulders, triceps, and core muscles activated as they complete the ring dip.

Watch the video clip below for a full explanation of technique, tips and tricks for performing the movement with efficiency, as well as precautions for staying safe.

[embed]https://youtu.be/PMt1DhOzq98[/embed]

MOVEMENT BASICS:

  1. Set Up Rings at Proper Height: Depending on whether you use a band or not to complete the ring dip, you will want to set the rings up anywhere between hip and chest height. If you use a band beneath your legs as means of providing additional support for completing the movement, it is usually best to have rings between hip and chest height. If you are doing ring dips without any support, it is recommended that the rings are positioned closer to chest height so that your feet do not touch the ground while completing the movement.
  2. Biceps to Rings: To gain maximum benefit from the ring dip, you want to drop your body until your biceps touch the rings before you push upwards and lock out your arms at the top. The movement is not considered to standard unless you touch biceps to rings at the bottom and also achieve full lock-out of arms at the top.
  3. Hips Travel Up and Down: Once you hop up onto the rings with arms locked out, focus on bending at the elbows and lowering your entire torso down and back up again. You should visibly see your hips travel up and down. If this is not happening, it may mean that you’re simply leaning forward as you bend your elbows, in order to touch your biceps to the rings. Without the full range of motion with your body weight traveling up and down, you will not receive the strength benefits from the movement.
  4. Kip for Momentum: You can use a kip while doing ring dips as a way to more quickly and efficiently complete a series of ring dips. To create a kip, quickly raise your knees toward your chest at the bottom of the ring dip and start to press up.

QUESTIONS: Ready to get started, or curious to learn more about how Fierce Play can help you meet your health and wellness goals? Contact us for more information. Also feel free to check out more of our videos series to learn how to perform the basics with solid form and efficiency.

HANGING GYMNASITCS SERIES: Technique at Every Stage

Fierce Play’s Hanging Gymnastics Series focuses on proper technique, as well as tips & tricks, to master some of the foundational movements that will be integrated into many of the workouts you will perform. Start your next workout with the confidence and skills to do the movement safely and effectively.